While no one ever wants to suffer any type of injury, people in Seattle may take some solace from the assumption that if they suffer an injury at work, workers’ compensation benefits will help them cover a portion of their accident expenses. Unfortunately, securing such coverage is not always a cut-and-dry process. 

State laws require most employers in Washington to carry workers’ compensation coverage for their employees. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. When these exist, the potential for earning such benefits may become complicated. 

Restaurant chain sued by family of deceased employee 

This fact is clearly demonstrated in a recent lawsuit filed in Texas. The family of a man who died during his shift at a local restaurant has sued for negligence. They claim that restaurant management did not take sufficient steps to ensure his safety after he complained of chest pains during his shift. Supervisors told him to sit in the lobby, where coworkers later found him unresponsive. 

The fast-food chain that owns the restaurant in this case does not carry workers’ compensation insurance (presumably as a cost-saving measure). Legal recourse for workers for such companies who sustain on-the-job injuries often has to come through other avenues, such as showing that the company was negligent in the handling of their case (and thus contributed to their injury). 

Determining fault in a workplace accident 

Typically, workers’ compensation coverage is available to injured employees regardless of fault. Yet in those cases where coverage details are nebulous (or an employer claims to not have to carry such coverage), one might need assistance in proving that they deserve financial assistance based on their employer’s negligent actions. An experienced attorney may be a good source of such assistance.